I teach at a Title I school (which means over 75% of our kids are on free/reduced breakfast/lunch status). Almost every morning one of my little fellows brings me FOOD from the cafeteria (an apple, pear, box of raisins…). read more →

When my sons were in junior high they had to write slam poems. One of my sons wrote about his struggle with having muscular dystrophy and not being able to play sports.  read more →

On a busy morning, I was driving my daughter to school. She was running late (making everyone else late). We had just dropped her sister off at school and she convinced me she needed some cocoa to stay warm at school. read more →

susi-teachersRecently I sent some coupons to my old elementary school (that I went to from ’89 to ’94), just in an act of kindness since I know some teachers have to provide their own supplies, etc. I wasn’t really expecting that the current principal would know me, but I still wrote a letter, telling her of my intention in sending the coupons and for some reason felt inspired to name the teachers.  read more →

I wrote to my former elementary school giving them some coupons and telling them who all my teachers were, etc. I was there between 22 and 27 years ago. read more →

I wanted to share an amazing experience we had in the past week.

My daughter attends a small private Lutheran Elementary School in Fort Wayne, IN. Last week, my daughter injured her heel and could not walk on it. After X-rays and a Dr visit, we arrived at school Tuesday morning in a wheelchair. For this small school community, to my knowledge, this was a new experience for the staff and students. read more →

When I was in second grade I often dealt with a bully from another class. The next year he apologized and said it was because he was jealous of my ‘boyfriend’ who by then had moved on. read more →

It was Thanksgiving Lunch at Maggie’s Middle school.

As my son, John stood next to Maggie the vice-principal of the school came to meet him and said, “You must belong to Maggie”. John smiled and said, “Yes I do!”

The vice-principal told John what a lovely girl Maggie is. That she has a wonderful attitude and is friends with everyone. She also commented on the fact that as a new middle-schooler, each student got to choose an elective class. It could have been art or music and indeed one of the options was to work with the mentally handicapped. And this was the choice that Maggie had made; to be a peer tutor. read more →

I lost control of a vehicle on an icy road coming home from a thanksgiving weekend at my brother’s family’s house. read more →

In 2015 Pembroke Primary School embarked on a multidisciplinary journey, where students were encouraged to work with peers, teachers and local experts to solve real-world problems. The students discussed issues such as animal welfare, health and homelessness. It was the idea of homelessness that really struck an emotional cord with the students. Their overwhelming gratitude for all that they have, as well as their concern for those sleeping rough lead to in-class discussions, emails and phone calls to organisations primarily based in Melbourne. Despite the students’ keen interest, it was unfortunate that this is where the ‘action’ aspect of their problem solving journey ended because of long distances, lack of connection, age limitations and perceivably unattainable goals. read more →

You often talk about the positive influences of teachers on Ripple Kindness and I couldn’t agree more, and I want to share how a teacher has helped me.

I’m a student and I was struggling recently with an issue that I didn’t feel comfortable sharing with my family. I have a teacher who is a very compassionate woman but also quite firm in the sense that she doesn’t overlook bad or cruel behaviour. She noticed that I was upset and because she is such an empathetic and thoughtful person, I felt comfortable enough to confide in her. read more →

As a 6th grade teacher, I feel the necessity to teach my students about kindness, compassion and empathy. read more →